How To Build Your Audience Well Before Launching Your Product

Sachin Rekhi

Most entrepreneurs assume that the marketing and audience building phase of their startup begins post product launch. They’ve been able to do this by investing heavily in building out a blog with independent value separate from their product yet designed to attract the target audience that their product will eventually serve. It launched its now famous Signal vs. Noise blog in 2001 to share their ideas about design, business, and the web.

Through Google Glass, darkly

Obo

1] But that’s the goal of Google X’s projects, including its 2013 flop, Google Glass. How did Google, a company known to be quantitative and data-driven, invest so much into a product that failed? They probably didn’t have an adequate product planning system in place. Their product process, described in that Fast Company write-up, was (1) Problem Identified, (2)nIdea Developed, (3) Solution Tested, (4) Prototype Built, (5) Product Introduced.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

First to Market Story: Facebook Home alone?

Obo

You might not remember this one because Facebook has had bigger headlines recently, but back in April of 2013 Facebook announced Facebook Home, a version of Facebook as your phone’s home screen. Despite the time, money, and resources that went into it, the product flopped. This is the second in a four-part series of posts on epic product fails and how better market validation might have prevented them. Market research Strategy Strategy & marketing

Customer Development Guide For Product Managers

The Product Coalition

It was launched in 2011 and went broke in 2013 because people didn’t buy the product. The authors relied on their intuition or professionalism, and didn’t account for the most important factor in product creation?—?the the product/market fit. In this situation, it doesn’t matter who creates the product, whether it’s two fellow developers or a corporation giant like Google?—?or There’s always a chance the product will fail. Position your product.