Fri.May 18, 2018

What Blocks our Empathy in the Design Thinking Process?

Mind the Product

Empathy is the foundation of the whole Design Thinking process. Putting ourselves in someone else’s shoes enhances our ability to receive and process information, which helps us understand how other people experience the world. As a product designer, I know that empathy helps me to recognise the difficulties that people face, alongside their needs and desires, and that I can then use that knowledge to design the best solution for their challenges. Being a product designer is exciting.

Why your growth depends on taking risks with your hiring strategy

Inside Intercom

There’s a key turning point for your hiring strategy in a rapidly scaling team or organization. The inflection point is when you go from only being comfortable hiring star candidates who pose very little risk to taking chances on candidates who don’t tick all the boxes but who have promise and potential. Making that transition smoothly is crucial for your longer-term growth.

The Untold Secret to a Perfect Release

Craft.io

The perfect product release. The one where everything falls into place right on time, the team is hyped and driven (as opposed to relieved and exhausted), and even the marketing materials are ready when they should be. How does that happen? Set goals that are borderline unrealistic.

Who is a Product Manager?

Rahul Abhyankar

Who is John Galt? I came across a question on LinkedIn – Why do you think the role of product manager is so misundestood? In every company, there are people dedicated to specific activities of building, communicating about and selling products. We find these people in R&D, marketing and sales teams. In contrast, the activities … Continue reading Who is a Product Manager? → Product Management

Hooked - How to Build Habit-Forming Products

Speaker: Nir Eyal, Author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products

Why do some products capture widespread attention while others flop? What makes us engage with certain products out of sheer habit? Is there a pattern underlying how technologies hook us? Nir Eyal answers these questions (and many more) by explaining the Hook Model—a four-step process embedded into the products of many successful companies to subtly encourage customer behavior. Through consecutive “hook cycles,” these products reach their ultimate goal of bringing users back again and again without depending on costly advertising or aggressive messaging.